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An Open Letter to Ta-Nehisi Coates

My siblings and I went to school and had good grades, immigrant essay, my mother working as a waitress, yet again. After graduation from college and medical school, I was privileged to take care of cancer patients. They had a warrant for him. She did not get any counseling, immigrant essay for the U. She and her immigrant essay were here on a tourist visa and switched to the application of a religious visa. She still had a valid tourist visa, she was coming to celebrate our 1 year anniversary of conclusion essay examples day we started dating. Racial discrimination is one of the commonest tackled problems.



My Immigration Story The story of U. Statistics do not tell the story of immigration. Since its inception, this nation has been continually infused with the energy of newcomers. Yet their assimilation has seldom been smooth. The challenges we face today are not new. Only the stories are. My mother, father, siblings, and I had been living in a poor part of town in Guadalajara, Mexico. My father worked as a ranchero and my mother used to waitress at a local pub and restaurant. I was the oldest of all my siblings and therefore, the leader.

I had to set an example for the younger ones and had to take care of them from the dangers of the world. One day, I was at home when I found out my father had been killed. It was a tragic day and my mother, devastated from the loss, wanted to move to America, speaking of being safer there and how America could help us all. We moved the following week, wanting to leave Guadalajara and the crime of the small town.

We were missed and there was no one else to care after the ranch since my father died, so they closed it down, but it was necessary. We no longer wanted to live in such a dangerous place, so when we moved to America, we found out we had taken up all of the small apartment complex. After we moved in, there was no more room, so I guess we were lucky.

My siblings and I went to school and had good grades, my mother working as a waitress, yet again. I grew up to be a police officer, wanting to be able to prevent crimes in my city, New York, like to what happened to my father. I thank American for the opportunities that it has given me and will be forever grateful. Marisela New York City I was born in Iran, and at the age of 10, my family and I absconded from the multi-systemic injustices and immigrated to the US in hopes of extended opportunities and freedom.

I was about 3-years-old when the Iran-Iraq war started. My experiences as an immigrant child growing up in the US helped me gain an appreciation for the gift of life. This is because my immigrant story is tied to so much loss and despair….

Through the years so many of my family members passed away both grandmothers, uncles, aunts, cousins , and I never got to see them again. I grew up here wishing that just for one holiday in my life I could have family around and feel the love that everyone else seemingly felt. Turning our backs on immigrant and refugee populations would mean we are no longer willing to nurture others like myself who have a chance to grow and contribute to what makes America already so great.

I ask you to please continue to fight tyranny and injustice by keeping the conversation going. We cannot allow this president and his administration to change the core American values that have been admired by the world through so many decades of exemplary practices of inclusivity.

I was four years old then. We came because my parents sought a better life for my brother and me, so they gave up the comfortable one they had. My parents always said it was because of President Johnson. Growing up, I was fortunate to make many wonderful friends of diverse ethnicities, religions, and backgrounds.

I was fortunate to have received an education that opened many doors for me. After graduation from college and medical school, I was privileged to take care of cancer patients.

I was privileged and fortunate to contribute to the discovery and development of several new cancer drugs that are available for patients today. As a parent, I am blessed to have one son serving our country as an officer in the 82nd Airborne Division and another son pushing the boundaries of medicine and science beyond that taught to me a generation ago.

I am an immigrant and a proud American. Like many immigrants, I am grateful for what America has to offer and strive to make America a better country. I was fortunate not to be a refugee. Peter Boston My brother was born in Peru. He came to the country when he was We had a hard life and he tried to make end meet for us. He got incarcerated when he was He is now 24 and about to get out and is facing deportation.

He has a green card and me and my mom are citizens. I want him to stay in the country. Came from Peru as a child and his whole life is here. It was a dumb mistake what he did. He has been convicted of 3 felonies and he has served 6 years in total. What should he do? Fight to stay or just leave? Alberto Tampa, Florida My grandparents were refugees at the time of partition in India from, what is now, Pakistan to present India. They worked long and hard days doing blue-collar jobs so that my parents would have a better chance at life.

My parents chose to honor their sacrifices by seeking a better life in the United States. We came to this country because my mother had a fellowship.

They recognized that the caste system in the US is based on where you go to school so they sent my sister and I to the best high schools and then the best colleges.

I am now in law school working to make sure our systems provide everyone with a fair shot at success and my sister is teaching English helping the next generation learn empathy. We honor the sacrifices of our family by trying to make the world a better place. We believe that the promise of America can be a reality for all of us. He suffered a lot.

He was far from his family in Mexico but convinced a good religious man to build a home for his family and brought his family home to the United States.

I stand proud every day because of them. I am proud to be an immigrant. All my family were happy for us but most of them were crying at the time we left. We left Yemen during the beginning of the revolution to change the president. Since then people are suffering from lack of food resources. Each year it gets worse. So for two years we have been hoping that Yemen will get better and it will be safe so we can go back and see my family after five years of being expatriates.

At that time grandpa was a soldier fighting for the South in the Vietnam War. My dad was 7 at the time when my grandfather was taken to a camp that was owned by the communists and was kept as a prisoner of war. In , when my dad was 24 years old, my dad and his whole family received airplane tickets to America to escape the communist takeover in Vietnam. My dad and his family chose to settle in California because he heard the weather was nice and there was a lot of job opportunities in San Jose.

When my dad first arrived in America. They lived in an apartment in Blossom Hill. His first job was in electronic assembling. He says getting the job was easy since he had a friend who helped him.

He wanted to learn the English language because he says living in America without knowing most of the words was difficult so he went to West Valley College for two years to learn English. Everyone has their own immigrant story. Growing in a small town, when 96 percent of the population is white is tough. The hardest topic… Is immigration reform. People are so uninformed.. He was deported in The last day I saw him was in a train station… And I had no idea why I was saying good bye… and why everyone was crying.

My mother is a single mom. Terrified of being deported. Just a couple weeks ago she was caught. I will be deported… I have to call my lawyer… Who will take care of my daughters? I hate hearing family members and friends calling us to be careful because in Hudson ICE was seen deporting families.

My dad is a resident alien but could never fix my situation. I have 2 younger siblings who are born in America. Sometimes I hate how unknowingly privileged they are. I did not know about immigration until recently and I cried for days.

My father, mother, sister, and I all have our passports. I am now 16 years old and counselors are telling me to start looking for college.

I feel so helpless and sometimes I wonder why my parents even decided to come here. There is nothing for us here. When I was 1 year old along with my 2 older brothers and my mom.

My dad was working in the U. My parents have had to go through so much just us.



Founded in , Immigrants Rising transforms individuals and fuels broader changes. With resources and support, undocumented young people are able to get an education, pursue careers, and build a brighter future for themselves and their community. American Immigration essaysEvery year, hundreds of thousands of immigrants, legal and illegal, from around the world, come into the United States. These immigrants have many different motivations; some enter the U.S. hoping to get a chance at a chance at a better life; others are refugees, escaping.

Total 1 comments.
#1 29.07.2018 â 20:05 William_Wallace:
Authoritative message :)